Oscar

Los DACs según Rob Watts

71 mensajes en este tema

Recomiendo este blog, está muy bueno y clarito en por qué los DAC suenan distinto. Ya me convencí completamente (porfiado asumido).

Y también por qué la reproducción digital suena tan distinto de la analógica en lo que a resolución espacial se refiere. Al parecer la decodificación del "timing" es crítica y por eso se explicaría esa diferencia y también explicaría por qué la profundidad de bits/frecuencia de muestreo si puede ser discriminada.

Cómo aún no se sabe de qué forma el cerebro logra localizar los sonidos que captan los oídos, y cómo esto nunca se tuvo en cuenta en la codificación digital del audio, sólo se hace lo que se puede para que la decodificación digital suene realista (al nivel del audio analógico)

Rob Watts es el cerebro tras los diseños de los DAC Chord.

Por muy buenas razones Chord no usa chips off the shelf en sus DACs

1

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Recomiendo este blog, está muy bueno y clarito en por qué los DAC suenan distinto. Ya me convencí completamente (porfiado asumido).

Y también por qué la reproducción digital suena tan distinto de la analógica en lo que a resolución espacial se refiere. Al parecer la decodificación del "timing" es crítica y por eso se explicaría esa diferencia y también explicaría por qué la profundidad de bits/frecuencia de muestreo si puede ser discriminada.

Cómo aún no se sabe de qué forma el cerebro logra localizar los sonidos que captan los oídos, y cómo esto nunca se tuvo en cuenta en la codificación digital del audio, sólo se hace lo que se puede para que la decodificación digital suene realista (al nivel del audio analógico)

Rob Watts es el cerebro tras los diseños de los DAC Chord.

Por muy buenas razones Chord no usa chips off the shelf en sus DACs

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Muy interesante pero y el link?

Enviado desde mi D5106 mediante Tapatalk

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Excelente:!!!

 

I thought my first blog post should be non technical, and frankly the only non technical audio related subject I could think of that people may find interesting was listening tests - but I guess this is pretty fundamental subject for audio. After all, it's the main thing that separates the extreme objectivists (you don't need to listen it's all nonsense) from the extreme subjectivists (you don't need to measure it's all nonsense) argument. Its at the heart of the major discourse on Head-Fi - a poster says product xyz sounds great,another politely states your talking twaddle - of course they are (hopefully) arguing on the sound quality based upon their own listening tests, biases and preferences. Indeed, I often read a post about a device I know well, and can't relate the posters comments with what I think about the device. Sometimes this is simply different tastes, and I can't and won't argue with that - whatever let's you as an individual enjoy music is perfect for you, and if its different for me then that's fine - vive la différence. But sometimes the poster simply gets it wrong, because they do not have the mental tools to accurately assess sound quality. Over the many years I have developed listening tests that tries to objectively and accurately assess sound quality. These tests are by no means perfect, and I admit that listening tests are very hard and extremely easy to get wrong - that's why it's important to try to get more accurate results, as its very easy to go down the wrong path.

 

Another problem is sensitivity - some people hear massive changes, some can barely discriminate anything at all. Fortunately, I consider myself in the former camp, but I don't know how much is innate or through training (I have done lots of tests in my time...) Certainly, having an objective methodology does help, even if it's only about being able to more accurately describe things. 

 

I also would like to talk about how listening tests are actually used in my design methodology, and what it is I am trying to accomplish when designing.

 

Assumptions, Assumptions...  

 

We all make assumptions; otherwise we couldn't get on with life, let alone get anything done. But the key for designing is to test and evaluate one's assumptions, and verify that the assumptions make sense. The key is about thinking where the assumptions lie and then evaluating whether the assumption is valid. For example, I am assuming you are an audiophile or somebody that is interested in audio. Valid? Yes, otherwise why would you be on Head-Fi. I am also assuming you know who Rob Watts is. Valid? Not really, you may be new to Head-Fi or know nothing about Chord. So quick summary - I am an audiophile, a designer of analogue electronics (started designing my own gear in 1980) then in 1989 started designing DAC's. Frustrated by the performance of DAC chips, in 1994 I acquired digital design skills and started designing my own DAC's creating pulse array DAC technology using a new device called FPGA's. These devices allowed one to make your own digital design by programming an FPGA. I then became an independent design consultant, and started working with Chord, and the first product was the DAC 64. This was unique, in that it was the first long tap length FIR filter (the WTA filter). In 2001 I started working with silicon companies, and designed a number of silicon chips for audio. Most of my activity was in creating IP and patenting it, then selling the patents. Today, I only work on high end audio, having stopped working with silicon last year.

 

From my beginnings as an audiophile, I was intrigued about the physiology of hearing and spent a lot of time reading up about how hearing works. In particular, I was intrigued about how hearing as a sensory perception is constructed - we take our hearing for granted, but there is some amazing processing going on. 

 

The invention of the WTA filter with the DAC 64 nicely exposes the conventional engineering assumption - that the length of an FIR filter (an FIR filter is used in DAC's to convert the sampled data back into a continuous signal) does not matter, that all we need is a suitable frequency response. But if one looks into the maths of sampling theory, then it is clear that to perfectly recover the bandwidth limited signal in the ADC then an infinite tap length FIR filter is needed. It is also obvious to me that if you had a small tap length filter, then the errors would present themselves as an error in the timing of transients. Now a transient is when the signal suddenly changes, and from my physiology of hearing studies transients are a vital perception cue, being involved in lateral sound-stage positioning, timbre, pitch perception and clearly with the perception of the starting and stopping of notes. So how are we to evaluate the changes in perception with tap length? Only by carefully structured listening tests.

 

Another area where there are assumptions being made is designing using psycho-acoustic thresholds. The rational for this is simple. From studies using sine waves, we know what the human ear can detect in terms of the limits of hearing perception. So if we make any distortion or error smaller than the ear's ability to resolve this (hear it) then it is pointless in making it any better, as the ear can't detect it. On the face of it, this seems perfectly reasonable and sensible, and is the way that most products are designed. Do you see the assumption behind this?

 

The assumption is that the brain is working at the same resolution as our ears - but science has no understanding of how the brain decodes and processes the data from our ears. Hearing is not about how well our ear's work, but is much more about the brain processing the data. What the brain manages to achieve is remarkable and we take it for granted. My son is learning to play the guitar, and every so often the school orchestra gives a concert. He was playing the guitar, along with some violins, piano, and a glockenspiel. We were in a small hall; the piano was 30 feet away, violins and guitar 35 feet, glockenspiel 40 feet. Shut my eyes and you perceive the instruments as separate entities, with extremely accurate placement - I guess the depth resolution is about the order of a foot. How does the brain separate individual sounds out? How does it calculate placement to such levels of accuracy? Psycho-acoustics does not have a depth of image test; it does not have a separation of instruments test; and science has no understanding of how this processing is done. So we are existing with enormous levels of ignorance, thus it is dangerous to assume that the brain merely works at the same resolution as the ears.    

 

I like to think of the resolution problem as the 16 bit 44.1k standard - the ear performance is pretty much the same as CD - 96 dB dynamic range, similar bandwidth. But with CD you can encode information that is much smaller than the 16 bit quantised level. Take a look at this FFT where we have a -144 dB signal encoded with 16 bit:

 

LL

 

So here we have a -144 dB signal with 16 bit data - the signal is 256 times smaller than the 16 bit resolution. So even though each quantised level is only at -96 dB, using an FFT it's possible to see the -144 dB signal. Now the brain probably uses correlation routines to separate sounds out - and the thing about correlation routines is that one can resolve signals that are well below the resolution of the system. So it is possible that small errors - for which the ears can't resolve on its own - become much more important when they interfere with the brains processing of the ear data. This is my explanation for why I have often reliably heard errors that are well below the threshold of hearing but nonetheless become audibly significant - because these errors interfere with the brains processing of ear data - a process of which science is ignorant off.

 

Of course, the idea that immeasurably small things can have a difference to sound quality won't be news to the majority of Head-fiers - you only need to listen to the big changes that interconnect cables can make to realize that. But given that listening tests are needed, that does not mean that objectivists are wrong about the problems of listening tests.

 

Difficulties in listening  

 

Placebo - convince yourself that your system sounds a lot better - and invariably it will. So your frame of mind is very important, so it's essential that when doing listening tests you are a neutral observer, with no expectations. This is not as easy as it sounds, but practice and forcing your mental and emotional state to be neutral helps.

 

Minimize variables. When lots of things change, then it becomes more difficult to make accurate assessments. So when I do a specific listening test I try to make sure only one variable is being changed.

 

Don't listen to your wallet. Many people expect a more expensive product to be naturally better - ignore it - the correlation between price and performance is tenuous.

 

Don't listen to the brand. Just because it is a brand with a cult following means nothing.  Ignore what it looks like too.

 

Do blind listening tests. If you are either unsure about your assessment, or want confirmation then do a single blind listening test where the other listener is told to listen to A or B. Don't leak expectation, or ask for value judgements - just ask them to describe the sound without them knowing what is A or B.

 

Remember your abilities change. Being tired makes a big difference to accuracy and sensitivity - more than 4 hours of structured AB listening tests means I lose the desire to live. Listening in unusual circumstances reduces sensitivity by an order of magnitude - double blind testing, where stress is put on listeners can degrade sensitivity by two orders of magnitude. Be careful about making judgements at shows for example - you may get very different results listening in your own home alone. Having a cold can make surprising differences - and migraines a few days earlier can radically change your perception of sound.  

 

Be aware - evaluating sound quality is not easy, and its easy to fall into a trap of tunnel vision of maximizing performance in one area, and ignoring degradations in other areas. Also, its easy to get confused by distortion - noise floor modulation, can give false impressions of more detail resolution. A bright sound can easily be confused with more details - distortion can add artificial bloom and weight to the sound. Its easy to think you are hearing better sound as it sounds more "impressive" but a sound that actually degrades the ability to enjoy music. Remember - your lizard brain - the part that performs the subconscious processing of sound, the parts that enjoy music emotionally - that can't be fooled by an "impressive" sound quality. Listen to your lizard brain - I will be telling how shortly.

 

Don't be afraid of hearing no reliable difference at all. Indeed, my listening tests are at their best when I can hear no change when adjusting a variable - it means I have hit the bottom of the barrel in terms of perception of a particular distortion or error, and this is actually what I want to accomplish.

 

Don't listen with gross errors. This is perhaps only appropriate for a design process - but it is pointless doing listening tests when there are measurable problems. My rule of thumb is if I can measure it, and it is signal dependent error, then its audible. You must get the design functioning correctly and fully tested before doing listening tests. 

 

Although I have emphasised the down side to listening, I find it remarkably easy to hear big changes from very small things - the ear brain is amazingly sensitive system. I once had an issue with a company accepting that these things made a difference, so I conducted a listening test with two "perfect" noise shapers - one at 180 dB performance, one at 200 dB performance. An non audiophile engineer was in the listening test, and afterwards he said that what really surprised him was not that he could hear a difference between two "perfect" noise shapers - but how easy it was to hear the differences.  

 

AB listening tests

 

Now to the meat of this blog, the actual listening tests. Here you listen for a set piece of music, and listen for 20 to 30 seconds, then go back and forth until you can assess the actual performance. The factors to observe or measure are:

 

1. Instrument separation and focus.

 

With instrument separation you are observing how separate the instruments sound. When this is poor, you get a loudest instrument phenomena: the loudest instrument constantly attracts your attention away from quieter instruments. When instrument separation gets better, then you can easily follow very quiet instruments in the presence of a number of much louder instruments. When instrument separation gets to be first rate then you start to notice individual instruments sounding much more powerful, tangible and real. Very few recordings and systems actually have a natural sense of instrument power - only very rarely do you get the illusion of a powerful instrument completely separate from the rest of the recording, in the way that un-amplified music can do. Poor instrument separation is often caused by inter-modulation distortion, particularly low frequency.  

 

2. Detail resolution.

 

Detail resolution is fairly obvious - you hear small details that you have not heard before- such as tiny background sounds or the ambient decay - and this is one measure of transparency. But its asymmetric - by this I mean you make an improvement, hear details you have not heard before, then go back, and yes you can just about make it out - once heard its easy to spot again with poorer detail resolution. Additionally, its possible to get the impression of more detail resolution through noise floor modulation - a brighter, etched sound quality can falsely give the appearance of more detail; indeed, it is a question of balance too; details should be naturally there, not suppressed or enhanced. This illustrates how difficult it is to get right. Small signal non-linearity is normally the culprit for poor detail resolution.   

 

3. Inner detail.

 

Inner detail is the detail you get that is closely associated with an instrument - its the sound of the bow itself on a violin for example, or the subtle details that go into how a key on a piano is played. Technically, its caused by small signal non linearity and poor time domain performance - improving the accuracy of transient timing improves inner detail.

 

4. Sound-stage depth.

 

A favorite of mine, as I am a depth freak. Last autumn we were on holiday in Northern Spain and we visited Montserrat monastery. At 1pm the Choir sing in the basilica, and we were fortunate enough to hear them. Sitting about 150 feet away, shutting ones eyes, and the impression of depth is amazing - and vastly better than any audio system. Why is the impression of depth so poor? Technically, small signal non-linearity upsets the impression of depth - but the amazing thing is that ridiculously small errors can destroy the brains ability to perceive depth. Indeed, I am of the opinion that any small signal inaccuracy, no matter how small, degrades the impression of depth.    

 

5. Sound-stage placement focus.

 

Fairly obvious - the more sharply focused the image the better. But - when sound-stage placement gets more accurately focused, the perception of width will shrink, as a blurred image creates an artificial impression of more width. Small signal non-linearity, transient timing and phase linearity contribute to this.    

 

6. Timbre.

 

This is where bright instruments simultaneously sound bright together with rich and dark instruments - the rich and smooth tones of a sax should be present with the bright and sharp sound of a trumpet. Normally, variation in timbre is suppressed, so everything tends to sound the same. Noise floor modulation is a factor - adding hardness, grain or brightness, and the accuracy of timing of transients makes a big difference.  

 

7. Starting and stopping of notes.

 

This is the ability to hear the starting of a note and its about the accuracy of transient timing. Any uncertainty in timing will soften edges, making it difficult to perceive the initial crack from a woodblock, or all the keys being played on a piano. Unfortunately, its possible to get confused by this, as a non linear timing error manifests itself as a softness to transients - because the brain can't make sense of the transient so hence does not perceive it - but in hard sounding systems, a softness to transients makes it sound overall more balanced, even though one is preferring a distortion. Of course, one has to make progress by solving the hardness problem and solve the timing problem so that one ends up with both a smooth sound but with sharp and fast transients - when the music needs it.      

 

8. Pitch and rhythm. 

 

Being able to follow the tune and easily follow the rhythm - in particular, listen to the bass, say a double bass. How easy is it to follow the tune? On rhythms its about how easy it is to hear it - but again, be careful, as it is possible to "enhance" rhythms - slew rate related noise modulation can do this.  In that case, things sound fast and tight all the time, even when they are supposed to be soft and slow.  

 

9. Refinement.

 

Clearly this links in with timbre, but here we are talking about overall refinement - things sounding smooth and natural, or hard and bright? Clearly, frequency response plays a major role with transducers, not so with electronics. Also, the addition of low frequency (LF) 2nd harmonic will give a false impression of a soft warm bass. Often I see designers balancing a fundamentally hard sound with the addition of LF second harmonic in an attempt to reduce the impact of the innate hardness - but this is the wrong approach, as then everything always sounds soft, even when its supposed to sound fast and sharp. In electronics, assuming THD is low, then noise floor modulation is a key driver into making things sound harder - negligible levels of noise floor modulation will brighten up the sound. Another very important aspect is dynamics and refinement - does the sound change as it gets louder - some very well regarded HP actually harden up as the volume increases - and harden up IMO in a totally unacceptable way.

 

"You know nothing Jon Snow"  

 

My favourite quote from Game of Thrones - but it illustrates the uncertainty we have with listening tests, particularly if done in isolation without solid measurements.

 

We are listening with recordings for which we do not know the original performance, the recording acoustic environment, nor do we know the equipment it was recorded with, the mastering chain, nor the source, DAC, amplifier, HP or loudspeaker performance in isolation. We are listening to a final result through lots of unknown unknowns. I can remember once hearing an original Beatles master tape played on the actual tape machine it was recorded with, using the actual headphones they used. It sounded absolutely awful. But then I was also lucky enough to hear Doug Sax mastering at the mastering labs - the equipment looked awful - corroding veroboard tracks on hand made gear - but it sounded stunning. So we are dealing with considerable uncertainty when doing listening tests. Its even more of a problem when designing products - how do you know that you are not merely optimizing to suit the sound of the rest of your system rather than making fundamental improvements to transparency? How can you be certain that a perceived softness in bass for example, is due to reduction in aberrations (more transparent) or increase in aberrations (less transparent).

 

Fortunately its possible to clarify or to be more sure with using two methods. First one is variation - all of the AB listening tests are really about variation - and the more variation we have, the more transparent the system is. So going back to the soft bass - if bass always sounds soft, then we are hearing a degradation. If it sounds softer, and more natural, but when the occasion allows sounds fast and tight too - then we have actually made an improvement in transparency. Again, its a question of being careful, and actually asking the question, is the system more variable. If it is more variable, its more transparent. So why bother with transparency and just make a nice sound? The reason I care so much about making progress to transparency is simply by listening to an un-amplified orchestra in a good acoustic makes one realize how bad reproduced audio is. Now I think I have made some big progress over the past few years - but there is still a way to go - particularly with depth, timbre variations and instrument power. This is why my focus is with the pro ADC project, as I will then be able to go from microphone to headphone/loudspeaker directly - my goal is being able to actually hear realistic depth perception exactly like real life.     

 

The second method of doing a sanity check on listening tests is with musicality...

 

Musicality

 

I ought to define what musicality actually is first, as people have different definitions. Some people think of it as things sounding pleasant or nice. That's not my idea of it - to me its about how emotional or involving the reproduced sound actually is. To me, this is the goal of audio systems - to enjoy music on. And plenty of people go on ad nauseam about this, so I am sorry to add to this. Merely talking about musicality does not mean you can actually deliver it - and it is something very personal.  

 

But it is important, and to test for musicality you observe how emotional and engaging the music actually is. The benefits of this approach is that your lizard brain that decodes and processes audio, and releases endorphins and makes your spine tingle, doesn't actually care whether you think it actually sounds better or not. And since enjoying music is what this hobby is about, then it is important to measure this. To do this, you can't do an AB test, you have to live with it, and record how emotionally engaging it actually is. That said, although its good as a test to check you are going in the right direction, its not effective for small changes, and it can only be based over many days or weeks with different music.

 

So listen to your lizard brain! I hope you got something useful from this.

 

Rob

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

@Oscar abandonaste la filosofía 2.1 (monitores más subwoofer)?

 

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Cuál filosofía Riff?

Aún creo que los subwoofer son útiles en un sistema de audio, y me parecen una mejor opción de precio que cuando se incluyen las subfrecuencias en los woofer.

Pero eso no es tema de este hilo po. Cuando se abra otro específico lo discutimos. Vale?

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Buen aporte.

Después de esto, de dacs,  que quieren que les diga, o sea, clarísima la cosa.

1

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

El distinguido Rob Watts (Chord) mantiene su blog abierto en head-fi y uno de sus últimos comentarios (post #155) es re-interesante:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/800264/watts-up/150

" DAC's themselves do not re-create timing perfectly - and theory is clear, we need infinitely capable reconstruction filters to perfectly reconstruct the timing of transients at the point the ADC sampled the continuous analogue signal. "

Dice que los DACs no son capaces de recrear el timing de los sonidos con absoluta precisión, que se requiere filtros de reconstrucción infinita (como algoritmo matemático) para eso.

Esto respalda la percepción general de que los DACs NOS (sin oversampling y por lo tanto sin filtro digital) suenen más "analógicos", aunque tienen la desventaja de que al usar filtro analógico, terminan filtrando parte de las frecuencias altas.

Pero dice también que cuando desarrolló el Hugo se encontró con mejores resultados de los que esperaba: " But with Hugo, things sounded very much better, and in ways I had not seen before - notably being able to perceive the starting and stopping of notes, and variations in timbre. Both these things are upset by timing errors.  "

Con el Hugo fue capaz de percibir claramente el inicio y término de los sonidos y las variaciones de timbre (con relación a sus diseños previos), sabiendo que estas características son afectadas por los errores de timing en la conversión. Lo que no sabía era qué tan relevante eran los errores de tiempo en el daño que hacían a la conversión, declarando: " At the time I did not know what I had done with the design to give this performance, although I had an idea. "

Recién con el Dave cree estar entendiendo por qué le achuntó, aunque sólo aventura una hipótesis: " the consequences of small timing errors has an enormous musical impact

Las estrategias que han ido siendo desarrolladas para corregir errores de timing afortunadamente son diversas:

Precisión de reloj más eliminación de etapas digitales (approach convencional R2R-NOS) en Metrum, Aqua, MSB, Reimyo, Audio Note

Precisión de reloj y desarrollo de algoritmos propios para reducir errores de timing en esquema single-bit sigma-delta en dCS, PSAudio, Chord

Precisión de reloj y desarrollo de algoritmos propios para reducir errores de timing en R2R + Oversampling: Schiit multibit

Tecnología de grabación: MQA de Meridian, que agrega los datos de localización de los sonidos al digitalizar, para así facilitarle la pega al DAC cuando des-digitalice

Habiendo tenido la suerte de escuchar DACs que tienen como parte de su objetivo de diseño el disminuir los errores de timing al pasar de D a A (Chord, dCS, Schiit multibit), me hace muchísimo sentido, porque el timbre es efectivamente más natural que con DACs convencionales lo que los hace "sonar" más "suavecitos y carnosos" sin ese "halo digital o ringing", pero sin perder resolución, donde el escenario es mayor y la localización de los sonidos en el escenario es mucho más precisa.

No era sólo cuestión de bits y frecuencia de muestreo.

Good reading

Editado por Oscar
0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

no es novedad , pero si un tema candente . 

el oido humano supera con creces los ics mas modernos . fpga etc etc 

por que la célula auditiva tiene una sensibilidad a nivel molecular para enviar las señales que llegan antes o después desde el exterior y son enviadas al cerebro que reconstruye la forma y posición de los instrumentos o lo que sea . 

por eso el tema de los relojes y las formas de enviar los datos de tiempo . 

cualquier audiólogo lo sabe , pero los audiófilos no .

Editado por ayuda
1

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

se envían gracias a  los canales de K+ sensibles a voltage , en la coclea hay un subtipo único KV3 , si mal no recuerdo y la reacción que lo permite no se puede medir por que es demasiado rápida , sólo se mide lo que "deja" 

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

A propósito de cómo se logra localizar los sonidos. En opinion de Rob Watts, aún no se sabe. No es sólo cuestión de oídos, lo que el cerebro hace con lo que escuchamos no es algo que se sepa, o en sus palabras, "existimos con enormes niveles de ignorancia al respecto y es peligroso asumir que el cerebro trabaja en la misma resolución que los oídos"

"Psycho-acoustics does not have a depth of image test; it does not have a separation of instruments test; and science has no understanding of how this processing is done. So we are existing with enormous levels of ignorance, thus it is dangerous to assume that the brain merely works at the same resolution as the ears."

Enviado desde mi SM-G920I mediante Tapatalk

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Así que con relación a la reproducción de la profundidad y el foco del sonido, Rob Watts se lamenta de que los sistemas de audio han sido usualmente muy pobres en conseguirlo, porque, en su opinión, pequeñas no-linealidades, no importa cuán pequeñas sean, bastan para que la impresión de profundidad se enrede, al igual que el foco donde se localiza el sonido

"Why is the impression of depth so poor? Technically, small signal non-linearity upsets the impression of depth - but the amazing thing is that ridiculously small errors can destroy the brains ability to perceive depth. Indeed, I am of the opinion that any small signal inaccuracy, no matter how small, degrades the impression of depth.

5. Sound-stage placement focus.

Fairly obvious - the more sharply focused the image the better. But - when sound-stage placement gets more accurately focused, the perception of width will shrink, as a blurred image creates an artificial impression of more width. Small signal non-linearity, transient timing and pase linearity contribute to this"

Y resulta que en eso está trabajando para sus futuros dacs, la solución declara que la anduvo descubriendo con los experimentos de prueba del Chord Hugo, ese dac no salió bueno por casualidad...err, en realidad si fue casualidad, pero con intención

Y ya está claro que Chord no son los únicos que tienen esa intención

Enviado desde mi SM-G920I mediante Tapatalk

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Después de leer a Rob Watts me he ido convenciendo que el principal destructor de la precisión en la localización de los sonidos es el preamplificador. Por su puesto si en el sistema tenemos un dac que no logra esa precisión, el pre no será un problema. Sólo lo notaremos si le conectamos una tornamesa, pero allí el pre de fono pasa a ser el cuello de botella. Los parlantes, lamentablemente también son restricción en proyectar imágenes localizadas, pero ños niveles de distorsión en parlantes son tan altos que no se me ocurre cual es su impacto y por qué algunos parlantes dan una imagen más precisa que otros en la localización de los sonidos, y esto si me parece que va a la par con la precisión en la reproducción del timbre

Enviado desde mi SM-G920I mediante Tapatalk

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
hace 5 minutos, Oscar dijo:

Después de leer a Rob Watts me he ido convenciendo que el principal destructor de la precisión en la localización de los sonidos es el preamplificador. Por su puesto si en el sistema tenemos un dac que no logra esa precisión, el pre no será un problema. Sólo lo notaremos si le conectamos una tornamesa, pero allí el pre de fono pasa a ser el cuello de botella. Los parlantes, lamentablemente también son restricción en proyectar imágenes localizadas, pero ños niveles de distorsión en parlantes son tan altos que no se me ocurre cual es su impacto y por qué algunos parlantes dan una imagen más precisa que otros en la localización de los sonidos, y esto si me parece que va a la par con la precisión en la reproducción del timbre

Enviado desde mi SM-G920I mediante Tapatalk

No me queda tan claro el objetivo final de la búsqueda, ¿reproducir el contenedor de la música tal como si se estuviese en el estudio de grabación?, considerando que en el proceso hay filtros, edición, masterización, efectos, múltiples pistas, etc, etc; cual sería el momento para detenerse y decir , ok, está perfecto, porque todas las partes de la cadena van a modificar el sonido, el DAC , el amplificador, el pre, la fuente, los parlantes; no se como podría llegar a la precisión en la reproducción del timbre, o de la nota, o de la ubicación del instrumento.Me siento enredado.

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
hace 11 minutos, cartonpiedra dijo:

No me queda tan claro el objetivo final de la búsqueda, ¿reproducir el contenedor de la música tal como si se estuviese en el estudio de grabación?, considerando que en el proceso hay filtros, edición, masterización, efectos, múltiples pistas, etc, etc; cual sería el momento para detenerse y decir , ok, está perfecto, porque todas las partes de la cadena van a modificar el sonido, el DAC , el amplificador, el pre, la fuente, los parlantes; no se como podría llegar a la precisión en la reproducción del timbre, o de la nota, o de la ubicación del instrumento.Me siento enredado.

No te enredes , en los estudios quieren la reproducción tal cual se grabó , los audiofilos queremos que suene como nos gustaría que sonara la música.. :rolleyes:

Editado por lag
0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
Ahora, cartonpiedra dijo:

No me queda tan claro el objetivo final de la búsqueda, ¿reproducir el contenedor de la música tal como si se estuviese en el estudio de grabación?, considerando que en el proceso hay filtros, edición, masterización, efectos, múltiples pistas, etc, etc; cual sería el momento para detenerse y decir , ok, está perfecto, porque todas las partes de la cadena van a modificar el sonido, el DAC , el amplificador, el pre, la fuente, los parlantes; no se como podría llegar a la precisión en la reproducción del timbre, o de la nota, o de la ubicación del instrumento.Me siento enredado.

61896021_PA271852.JPG

1

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
hace 29 minutos, lag dijo:

No te enredes , en los estudios quieren la reproducción tal cual se grabó , los audiofilos queremos que suene como nos gustaría que sonara la música.. :rolleyes:

aaajá, con ese dato puedo entender un poco para donde va el asunto, y el porque se transforma en un camino sin retorno, el G.A.S. es constante.

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

En realidad la idea es lograr reproducir lo más fielmente posible lo que está en la gabación. La información de posición está registrada, artificial o natural o como sea que quedó en el registro, al igual que el timbre y el nivel de volumen y la dinámica, etc. La idea entonces es que esa información no sea alterada ni menos eliminada por el sistema que la reproduce, sobre todo porque el foco y la profundidad de los sonidos agregan una enorme dosis de realismo a la reproducción, la música se siente más cercana, se siente más real. Y no es algo que a quienes graban les salga por casualidad, hay todo un cuento con la localización de los micrófonos, que de alguna manera también se intenta lograr con la edición cuando no se graba en vivo

Enviado desde mi SM-G920I mediante Tapatalk

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

En parte, la posición de una fuente sonora se determina moviendo la cabeza (los oídos). Lo hacemos nosotros, los perros, los gatos...

Es una especie de triangulación que en un escenario real funciona y no sé cómo pueda replicarse en una grabación. ¿Moviendo los micrófonos?  

Editado por Riff
0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
No te enredes , en los estudios quieren la reproducción tal cual se grabó , los audiofilos queremos que suene como nos gustaría que sonara la música.. :rolleyes:

Naa, yo creo que los artistas son mejores que los audiófilos para hacer los sonidos de la música

De ahí pa delante es gusto individual

Enviado desde mi SM-G920I mediante Tapatalk

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Cualquier diferencia de timing que produzca un dac es por lejos muy menor al group delay que produce un altavoz con filtros pasivos.

Luego unos pocos microsegundos de modulacion no va a hacer gran diferencia en la imagen stereo.   Lo demás es vender pomadas.

Un saludo

 

 

 

 

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

No estoy vendiendo nada ni tengo intereses involucrados. No entiendo por qué la mala onda de algunos, estaba contando una experiencia y mi opinión de algo que comprobé y que consideré valioso compartir.

Qué lástima que el mayor interés que desperté fue el de polemizar, parece que la embarré. Vamos a escuchar música mejor, cauros.

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
3 hours ago, _162 said:

Cualquier diferencia de timing que produzca un dac es por lejos muy menor al group delay que produce un altavoz con filtros pasivos.

Luego unos pocos microsegundos de modulacion no va a hacer gran diferencia en la imagen stereo.   Lo demás es vender pomadas.

Un saludo

 

 

 

 

Es cierto Pipe, pero las opiniones técnicas no son bienvenidas en estos temas, donde lo subjetivo-mistico se impone.

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

bueno , creo que el autor del articulo anda mas perdido en medicina de lo que yo ando en electronica digital  . por lo que me siento en el derecho de acotar  ;

el oido y el cerebro no se pueden compar en - resolucion - no existe esa analogia . 

el oido simplemente es el microfono del cuerpo , el organo de corti principalmente . la extension de la membrana basilar esta ordenada de afuera hacia adentro y enrollada como un caracol a partir de las celulas que captan vibraciones desde los 20khz hasta las mas internas que captan 20hz . por si acaso a menos que tengas menos de 17 años no van a formar sonido en los 18khz , promedio 40 años el foro ? 14khz con mucha suerte . 

la corteza auditiva que es donde llega el cableado del organo de corti (octavo par craneal , nervio auditivo ) tambien esta ordenada "como un piano" y es alli donde se producen todos los sonidos que oimos desde afuera o desde adentro . las señales electricas viajan a la velocidad de la luz y el sistema limbico que maneja las emociones esta conectado a la corteza auditiva , ( se encienden areas en un spet del sistema limbico) al oir ciertos sonidos . Es sentido comun , al oir el ruido de un terremoto uno se asusta etc etc asi queda todo codificado en la corteza y el sistema limbico . pero funciona alreves que un equipo , nosotros transformamos ondas de sonido en electricidad (pensamiento)  y el equipo transforma electricidad en ondas de sonido , un clasico del emisor-receptor . es muy pequeño el nivel del fenomeno nivel molecular y ademas la electronica trata de explicar la realidad imitandola como mejor pueda , por ejemplo asumiendo que un parlante se comporta como una resistencia de 8R , por que no se podria analizar de otra manera por la complejidad , es como una instantanea de una pelicula que corre a la velocidad luz , pero los resultados dan fe que funciona . lo tecnico se demuestra fielmente en la realidad del papel , en la practica no es asi por que los fenomenos son mucho mas compejos . 

en todo caso de acuerdo en el timing de los dacs que hay una relacion directa con la manera de reconstuir las imagenes , pero el autor se sorprende por que no tiene idea de fisiologia humana , si no no estaria sorprendido .  se necesita una camara de femtosegundo para ver un haz de luz en camara lenta , crystek tiene un reloj de femtosegundo para sonido . personalmente no me gusta el camino que tomo la electronica digital , sigo pensado que los mejores resultados de imagen y profundiad lejos , fueron a traves de is2 . no he oido algo mejor , en chord tampoco . tambien es mi opinion que el cerebro se distrae demasiado con el espectaculo 3D del stereo , en lo personal por eso sigo escuchando ambos mono y estrereo , pero sin duda el cerebro descansa mas en monoaural , se enfoca en la musica y no en los "bells and whistles" de la mezcla . tambien el tono cambia con u timing bueno , se sientes mas "afinados" los tonos de los instrumentos , siempre he pensado que los sonidos son para causar emociones pero no impresiones .

3

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

en todo casi si existen herramientas de monitoreo profundo de la corteza auditiva , se llama spect de corteza y no es para nada nuevo 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11770000

tambien puedes monitorear con un eeg las ondas que producen los sonidos .

puedes usar tambien una electrococleografia para monitorear el funcionamiento del organo de corti . 

potenciales evocados 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK10820/

"Psychophysical experiments show that humans can actually detect interaural time differences as small as 10 microseconds"  y ahora pipe que dices ? tienes que saber de fisiologia humana . 

además la localizacion en el humano para los sonidos es bajo los 3khz . a menos que haya un buho inscrito en el foro que localizan sobre los 9Kzh .

 

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

{option}3166zhj.png

se sabe que la oliva media superior MSO es la que se encarga de decodificar la localizacion de los sonidos , esto se sabe desde 1948 , para que se lo envíes a Mr Watts . 

Jeffress L. A. A place theory of sound localization. J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. (1948);41:35–39. [PubMed] [Reference list]

no se dejen sorprender ya que todo lo que hay ahora en sonido es lo mismo de antes hecho diferente 

Editado por ayuda
0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
%7Boption%7D3166zhj.png

se sabe que la oliva media superior MSO es la que se encarga de decodificar la localizacion de los sonidos , esto se sabe desde 1948 , para que se lo envíes a Mr Watts . 

Jeffress L. A. A place theory of sound localization. J. Comp. Physiol. Psychol. (1948);41:35–39. [PubMed] [Reference list]

no se dejen sorprender ya que todo lo que hay ahora en sonido es lo mismo de antes hecho diferente 

Creo que eso es lo que marca la diferencia, la forma de hacer las cosas.

Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
hace 12 horas, Oscar dijo:

Naa, yo creo que los artistas son mejores que los audiófilos para hacer los sonidos de la música emoji6.png

De ahí pa delante es gusto individual

Enviado desde mi SM-G920I mediante Tapatalk

Es justamente lo que dije , por si no se entendió... 

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
hace 8 horas, AudioLuthier dijo:

Este instrumento debe ser imposible de grabar y reproducirlo a menos que se tenga un dac chord .....

 

https://goo.gl/images/cg8PiZ

Por que dices eso , con los que haces tu no se podría? Yo pensaba que eran capaces ...

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Una razón por lo que tenemos "2 orejas" en cada lado es precisamente para poder localizar de donde se emite el sonido..... Ya que la distancia entre las orejas hacen que el sonido lleguen o se perciban con una diferencia de tiempo.... No entiendo en qué se complica esto y se necesita tanta técnica para reproducirlo? Y que prácticamente que solo chord tenga la receta se me hace más dudoso sinceramente..... DAC de serie o paralelos tienes sus contras y ventajas y tampoco son perfectos, pero no veo la razón técnica en donde estos no reproduzcan correctamente la posición física del instrumento, ya que básicamente se relata a la diferencia de nivel entre los 2 canales -siempre se grabado de esta manera para reproducirlo en "stereo"  e identicamente sea análogo o digital. Personalmente mi mayor asombro audiofilo fue con un amp que prácticamente hacia desaparecer los parlantes y solo se sentía el flujo del sonido, y el DAC usado era uno "vintage" y con otro moderno solo se notaba más detalles -pero todos  los parlantes "desaparecían" verbalmente :) -como cuando joaco usa mono para no desconcentrarse :) solo el flujo musical con una imagen tredimensional de sonido -nunca lo e experimentado tan claro como ese amp, incluso mi propio systema no hac desaparecer mis parlantes -pero voy a modificarlos y probar si ayuda :) por cierto, SET tiene más posibilidades de dar este efecto ya que es un solo componente activo que no mescla más señales idénticas con otras similares pero fuera de tiempo :) que este es el eber al usar muchos transistores de salida en paralelo....... 

Otro mayor problema y de mucha mayor "magnitud" es que el 99% de parlantes tienen una variación de sencibilidad entre 3 a 1 decibel..... Más que nada en parlantes de segmento bajo y medio, esta diferencia hace que la mayoría no sean tan buenos para reproducir correctamente un sonido tredimensional..... Identico -pero de menor grado- es la variación entre los canales del resto de electrónica :) pero generalmente es en systemas de más alta calidad que la diferencia de gain entre los 2 canales se mantiene debajo de 0,5dBs, esta diferencia de canales en los parlantes es más exclusiva -pero es bien notoria :) 

ahora, este parámetro llamado linearidad también influye mucho, ya que la diferencia entre canales que lo hace "stereo" se reduce más si el nivel de frecuencia varía con la impedancia /carga.... 

Interesante tema, pero creo que es más complicado y complejo que lo que chord supuestamente describe o trata de explicar por qué lo hacen a un mejor producto :) 

el grafico de la bicicleta lo describe muy atinadamente :) 

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios
hace 8 horas, AudioLuthier dijo:

Este instrumento debe ser imposible de grabar y reproducirlo a menos que se tenga un dac chord .....

 

https://goo.gl/images/cg8PiZ

jajajjajajajjajaja tantas vueltas para llegar a eso!!! vendo vendo chord caserita...

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

espero que mi comentario no se tome a mal es una talla no mas!! jejej

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Por cierto, un vídeo que ya se a publicado aquí ase muchos tiempos atrás :) usen auriculares y cierren los ojos :) grabación digital 100% solo que manejado con un algoritmo dedicado -no da el mismo efecto en parlantes, ya que la acústica interfiere y varía los tiempos en que el sonido alcanse los oídos :) creo que es 4-5 años atrás que lo puse aquí :D 

segun recuerdo, esta firma estaba tratando de hacer un algoritmo que prestará el mismo efecto en parlantes normales :) 

 

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Matador, tienes 2 orejas en cada lado? con razón usas ese gorro blanco pa taparlas :happy4

0

Compartir este post


Enlace al mensaje
Compartir en otros sitios

Registra una cuenta o conéctate para comentar

Debes ser un miembro de la comunidad para dejar un comentario

Crear una cuenta

Regístrate en nuestra comunidad. ¡Es fácil!


Registrar una cuenta nueva

Iniciar Sesión

¿Ya tienes cuenta? Conéctate aquí.


Iniciar Sesión