Saltar al contenido
Pegar imágenes en el foro, mediante equipos móviles ×

Por qué Apple debería vender tornamesas


Alberto

Recommended Posts

Se pregunta el amigo Mathew Trammell, editor de The New Yorker:


February 3, 2016
[b]Why Apple and Beats Should Sell Turntables[/b]

[b]By [url="http://www.newyorker.com/contributors/matthew-trammell"]Matthew Trammell[/url][/b]

[url="http://www.newyorker.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Trammell-Vinyl-Revival-1200.jpg"] [img]http://www.newyorker.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Trammell-Vinyl-Revival-690x460-1454005445.jpg[/img] [/url] Increasing consumer interest in vinyl records could be an opportunity for the music industry to revise and revive its strategy. Credit Photograph by Graeme Robertson / eyevine / Redux [url=""][/url][url=""][/url]In January, 2.6 million viewers tuned into VH1’s “The Breaks,” the network’s third foray into original film. Set in 1990, the movie follows three young music hopefuls chasing executive dreams, and warmly relives the transitional moment when hip-hop’s economic scope and cultural impact truly blossomed. Meanwhile, ads have started popping up around the city for the HBO original drama “Vinyl,” which pulls the premise further back in time: the director, Martin Scorsese, promises an up-close look at the hedonistic nineteen-seventies rock machine, with period cameos to boot.

In the wake of well-reviewed dramas like “Nashville” and “Empire,” both the HBO and the VH1 projects bank on a growing public interest in the industry of music: the unseen meetings unfolding in label buildings and recording studios that directly impact what listeners hear through our headphones each day. But there’s a more curious, and certainly less intentional, link between the two: both titles invoke records, those clunky grooved discs that remain one of popular music’s most peculiar symbols. “The Breaks” alludes to a 1980 Kurtis Blow song, and by extension to the drum solos that were looped into hip-hop’s sonic skeleton by d.j.s in the Bronx and Queens who lifted them from seventies funk records: Billy Squire’s “Big Beat,” the Skull Snaps’ ”It’s a New Day,” the Honey Drippers’ ”Impeach the President.” The title “Vinyl” is even more direct, aiming squarely for the last generation that remembers records as a standardized format. The HBO show’s score orbits the A-sides of the time: the Rolling Stones, Lou Reed, the New York Dolls. These are the bands and images persistently associated with vinyl’s heyday, but a boomer coveting his original copy of “Sticky Fingers” may not be entirely representative of vinyl’s newest devotees.

“When I started in this business,” the protagonist of “Vinyl,” Richie Finestra, waxes at the start of the trailer, “rock and roll was real, and pure.” Industry trackers have used music fans who believe in platitudes like these to explain away the swell of vinyl sales for the past decade, but the data suggests it’s more than nostalgia that’s driving people toward the medium. The format’s double-digit growth year after year hit a new peak in 2015, with [i]Time[/i] reporting that vinyl revenues in the U.S. surpassed revenue from ad-supported streaming on services like Spotify and YouTube for the first time. The British recording industry’s chief executive, Geoff Taylor, in an address to music executives and artists last November (aptly titled “Back to the Future of Music”), explained how U.K. labels earned more from vinyl that year than from fourteen billion YouTube streams, before adding, “It’s crazy.” Over-all, vinyl sales grew over fifty-two per cent in 2015 from the previous year, while CD sales fell nearly thirty-two per cent in the same window—CDs still outsell vinyl records by a wide margin, but they aren’t growing, and vinyl isn’t plateauing.

In a music industry that still hasn’t quite found homeostasis, the unexplained growth of the outlier medium continues to bewilder analysts and critics. Trend pieces typically credit the unprompted interest in vinyl to a push-back against MP3s and digital streaming on the part of hobbyists who simply prefer to hold music in their hands. Descriptors like “warm” are used to describe the “feel” of vinyl, with the mysterious “feel” itself a qualifier that only “hip audiophiles” ever seem to measure. But this reasoning obscures the most interesting facet about the turn towards vinyl, and a corresponding opportunity. Namely, you don’t play a record with your hands, but with a record player. Collecting records demands a separate home-technology investment: researching, comparing, and ultimately investing in a complicated piece of equipment that demands physical attention, component parts, and significant shelf space. Today’s selection of record players ranges from the cheaper, less reliable models focussed on kitsch design—the sort that sit in front of Urban Outfitters—to expensive pro-models heavy on function and meant to tantalize the nerdiest gearheads. Surprisingly, there’s no standard, user-friendly turntable marketed to the wide chunk of consumers in the middle.

Audio equipment has proven to be one of the most lucrative categories left in the industry of music. Consider what Beats did for headphones or even what iPods did for portable music players, at their respective peaks. What were once decentralized slates of products with varying functionality came to be dominated by a single brand. Beats standardized the idea of high-quality headphones to the average consumer, just as the iPod standardized the idea of the high-storage MP3 player. They both established a new category of product to be consumed alongside the songs that artists churn out each year.

Ironically, both Apple and Beats have taken a full turn away from electronics to software, through Apple Music. Why not square the musical equation, and offer the best experience in both physical and digital listening formats, in the home and on the go? Labels will only share in the incentive. Vinyl is more expensive to produce, but is worth more per unit to artists and labels than a Vevo stream, and is almost entirely impractical to pirate—unlike CDs, which beg to be ripped of their digital contents immediately, and lose most of their tangible value afterwards. But the fraught promotional attempts for vinyl suggest how the disconnect remains. This past holiday season, Amazon’s top-selling home-audio product wasn’t a wireless Bluetooth speaker system (or an extra-durable aux cord) but an all-in-one Jensen JTA-230 three-speed stereo turntable with built-in speakers, priced at just over fifty dollars. If Jensen Electronics beat out Sonos, Beats, and Bose, why haven’t you and I ever heard of it?

[url=""][/url][url=""][/url]Instead of seeing vinyl buyers as niche-minded know-a-lots who pine for a bygone era like a baby-boomer air guitarist or an old-school rap purist does, labels and brands alike might do better to see the growing population of vinyl buyers as curious and self-motivated new consumers, investing in an unfamiliar medium specifically for the music-purchasing and listening experience it may provide them in the future. As executives across the industry obsess over the power of music “discovery” and how it can be monetized, there may be no more important consumer for them to communicate with and cultivate than the vinyl-curious. Retail-level efforts, like Record Store Day, mismark the demand. The vinyl boomlet isn’t about old Pink Floyd reissues or Pete Rock samples; it’s about new apartments, and the things young people buy to fill them. As the development and marketing of portable music players and headphones free music buyers, the turntable could be the key to finding them back at home. At least until they turn on the television.
art. original: http://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/why-apple-and-beats-should-sell-turntables


Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Seria interesante ver lo que resulta, un iphone 3 con capsula?

[img]http://img.weburbanist.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/turntable-white-3.jpg[/img]

Algo así pero en blanco?

[img]http://realitypod.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/vertical-vinyl-record-1.jpg[/img]

Braun Ya les lleva años de ventaja :)

[img]http://svgstock.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/dieter-rams-braun-pcs4-record-player-by-svgstock-660.jpg[/img]

Interesante el estudio de mercado del artículo, creo que si alguien la pega con un equipo de diseño, sea apple o samsung, va a ser un éxito de ventas.

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

[quote name='Alberto' date='08 February 2016 - 10:34 AM' timestamp='1454942092' post='338736']
Hola hectori,
yo creo, al final, que el artículo es una ironía.
saludos
[/quote]

Si se entiende... de todas formas, imaginar una IRecord Air (por el tema de diseño), sería interesante :lol::lol:

[img]http://40.media.tumblr.com/5d84316f2f70dc8decbe0dfe27c0dc7f/tumblr_n21ed9zl1H1snmimpo1_1280.jpg[/img]

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Si Apple hiciera tornas, inventarían un nuevo tipo de montaje, solo para la Iturntable, un cable especial, un motor especial, un plato especial, discos especiales, agujas especiales, capsulas, brazos, mats, cubiertas, uffff, etc!
Y todo seria carísimo!
Las marcas tendrían que pagar licencias para poder producir sus iCartridges, iCables, iBrazos, ufff, no quiero imaginar ese mundo
Ni cagando, protejamos el estándar, por favor!

"No satisface el saber mucho, sino el sentir y gustar internamente de las cosas" San Ignacio de Loyola

 

¿Y tu hermana?

 

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

yo creo que Apple no va a hacer tornamesas. La ironía es a la estrategia de ventas que tomó la industria, con un formato que modificaba culturalmente la forma de escuchar y que se puede piratear.

Editado por Alberto
Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

[quote name='jsc010' date='08 February 2016 - 11:21 AM' timestamp='1454944885' post='338743']
el plato walkman se supone que era para andarlo trayendo... :o

[img]http://www.decodedmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/ps-f9.jpg[/img]
[/quote]


Aquí hay una... pero el precio es una soberana locura!!! :o:o

http://articulo.mercadolibre.cl/MLC-433297134-tornamesa-sony-psf5-direct-drive-reliquia-marantz-jbl--_JM

Editado por Juanzuniga

Vndo tclado barato, qu l falta una tcla 😏

Nakamichi Amplifier1, Cassettedeck2, ST-3s Tuner, Unison Research Unico CD, Technics SH-GE90 DSP, Technics SL-D33 Turntable, EMOTIVA Stealth DC-1 DAC, JBL model 4312 Control Monitor

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Pienso que ese articulo es mas bien un lamento nostalgico de tiempos pasados. La pregunta clave que hace es: "Why not square the musical equation, and offer the best experience in both physical and digital listening formats, in the home and on the go?"

Y la respuesta es obvia: a nadie del publico masivo, de esos que hacen los miles de millones de dolares de beneficio neto de Apple, le interesa algo así. El vinilo fue solo una forma de vender musica para escucharla a voluntad, mediante la tecnología disponible la publico masivo en esa epoca. Nada mas. Ni siquiera servía para conservar audio de alta calidad. Para eso estaban los masters, en cinta magnetica. Y tiene un monton de desventajas tanto técnicas como de calidad de audio empezando por la ecualizacion RIAA, que es un soberano despelote porque cada sello la interpretaba como quería, y eso siempre fue así, hasta hoy. En fin, no es mi intención discutir la calidad del vinilo. Pero de que se inventó para vender punchi-pun de eso no hay duda.

Hoy en día el punchi-pun masivo va por el streaming que te otorga la posibilidad de escuchar la musica que quieres, cuando quieres, donde quieres. Tiene la ventaja (desde el punto de vista de Apple) que te encadena a un pago mansual minusculo, pero para siempre y multiplicado por millones de usuarios (ahí esta el negocio), y de paso elimina el pirateo al no haber sustrato fisico del contenido musical.

Imagino que cuando esto se masifique y desaparezca la venta de musica en sustrato físico lo que vendrá como subproducto serán los streaming de alta calidad para audiófilos, y evidentemente a otro precio. Probablemente se siga editando musica en CDs o vinilos por pequeños emprendedores que aprovechan el mercado de nicho, algo asi como las empresas que siguen haciendo película de 35mm para los nostalgicos, pero siempre tendrán que convivir con el escaso publico interesado compuesto solo por audiófilos, que son una fraccion muy reducida del mercado, y con el pirateo.

Y lo mismo va para el video. Con Netflix me evité comprar su buen numero de blurays. De mas de 80 BR que compré en 2014, el año pasado compré solo 18

La respuesta para Trammell a su pregunta "[b] [/b]Why Apple and Beats Should Sell Turntables" sería: They shouldn't. It's bad business

saludos

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

[quote name='flamberge' date='10 February 2016 - 12:46 AM' timestamp='1455079583' post='338943']
Pienso que ese articulo es mas bien un lamento nostalgico de tiempos pasados. La pregunta clave que hace es: "Why not square the musical equation, and offer the best experience in both physical and digital listening formats, in the home and on the go?"
La respuesta para Trammell a su pregunta "[b] [/b]Why Apple and Beats Should Sell Turntables" sería: They shouldn't. It's bad business

saludos
[/quote]

la pregunta que se hace el articulista se basa en los datos de ventas de la RIAA https://www.riaa.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/2015_RIAAMidYear_ShipmentData.pdf , no en la nostalgia y menciona como ironía a Apple, uno de los impulsores de la música sin formato físico....y es una pregunta retórica.

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

A mi modo de entenderlo, hace una reseña del formato y de pasada ironiza no solo el relacion a un eventual interes de Apple, sino que tambien en relacion a los "hip audiophiles". Y no lo menciona, tal vez tu ingles es mejor que el mío, pero creo leer un tono de evidente nostalgia. El fondo del articulo, que no es retórico, y que vale tanto para Apple como para los que dominan el mercado masivo, es sugerir que la industria capte nuevo publico interesado en el formato. Y eso no va a ocurrir, al menos en cantidades (y $) que interese a la industria masiva. Les guste o no, el vinilo es un formato obsoleto. Igual que la pelicula de 35mm, por eso hice la comparacion.

Editado por flamberge
Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

[quote name='flamberge' date='10 February 2016 - 10:07 AM' timestamp='1455113264' post='338975']
Y eso no va a ocurrir, al menos en cantidades (y $) que interese a la industria. Les guste o no, el vinilo es un formato obsoleto. Igual que la pelicula de 35mm, por eso hice la comparacion.
[/quote]
el crecimiento sostenido que dan cuenta las cifras de ventas de vinilos de RIAA son el soporte para las elucubraciones, más allá de quién sea quién compre, hip o no. En términos culturales, la forma de escuchar música en un formato como el vinilo es distinta y es esa una de las motivaciones, que van más allá del hip. Requieren un mayor acto de concentración, en comparación a la posibilidad de hacer funcionar el mercado en base a la ultra explotación del hit o usar la música como fondo de otra actividad en el caso de los artefactos portátiles. Porbablemente y esta es una opinión personal, la relación con la música es más profunda cuando se debe acceder a ella a través del acto de instalar un disco y escucharlo entero. Curiosamente, no es el CD el que produce este efecto (ni en las ventas), probablemente por la posibilidad de acceder con mayor facilidad a una canción y saltar el resto. Darle ese espacio o ese rito a la música no es un acto de nostalgia, es una reflexión que puede ser actual ahora o en 20 años más porque habla de cuál es el espacio y valoración que le damos a la música.
Que sea obsoleto el formato, es al menos discutible. La música digital en alta resolución, comparable al sonido análogo, no es la copa el mercado. No quiero decir que sea un formato sin complicaciones; las tiene y muchas, pero en su situación óptima, es perfectamente competitivo en el alto nivel. Pero la verdad es que se continuaron diseñando y fabricando tornamesas y vinilos para audiófilos ininterrumpidamente, no por motivos nostálgicos. No lo es cuando puedes escoger entre un buen sonido digital y un buen sonido análogo. Los sellos de reediciones audiófilas se empezaron a multiplicar y/o agrandar sus producciones en un proceso mucho más allá del hip de lo últimos años. la industria va ahora un paso atrás, viendo qué es lo que hace la gente. Independiente que puede doblar la mano a la gente, cuando produce a menor costo, mayor profite, los cambios culturales puede que no terminen de generse automáticamente para siempre como respuesta del desarrollo técnico.
Como pregunta retórica no necesita ser contestada. Creo que de lo que se trata en el fondo, es de la reflexión en términos culturales, más allá si un formato es mejor que otro en su capacidad de entregar con mayor fidelidad el sonido original.

ps. La película 35 mm sigue siendo usada, por ejemplo, por muchos artistas, para sacar del comentario al hip. Su obsolescencia no está determinada por un problema técnico, sino porque la idustria dejó de fabricarla masivamente. La foto digital, por cierto puede emular la imaginería análoga, pero no puede producir la materia, ni el mismo acercamiento al acto fotográfico, que para algunos sigue siendo aspecto importante, pero no un aspecto cuantitativo, sino cualitativo.

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Y porque chucha cada tópico relacionado con vinilos da paso a estos testamentos filosóficos tan hueveados?
Da lo mismo si Apple hace o no tornamesas, esa es la verdad.
Mercado hay para todo, hasta para la mierda.

"No satisface el saber mucho, sino el sentir y gustar internamente de las cosas" San Ignacio de Loyola

 

¿Y tu hermana?

 

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

[quote name='ian curtis' date='10 February 2016 - 11:34 AM' timestamp='1455118464' post='338982']
Y porque chucha cada tópico relacionado con vinilos da paso a estos testamentos filosóficos tan hueveados?
Da lo mismo si Apple hace o no tornamesas, esa es la verdad.
Mercado hay para todo, hasta para la mierda.
[/quote]

Ian, puse este artículo precisamente porque invitaba a una reflexión, más que a contestar la pregunta. La forma en que la industria genera cultura a través de los medios técnicos que usa o deja de usar, no necesariamente terminan siendo absolutos y ese es un fenómeno interesante...sin entrar en mayores profundidades.
p.s. hueveado podría ser concebir el mundo en términos binarios.

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Apple es una empresa de computadores.... de hecho, es un hecho histórico que tuvieton un serio problema con Apple Records, en su momento, el sello grabador de los Bítls... si no recuerdo mal, el asunto se arreglo con la promesa de que Apple computers nunca se metería en los negocios de Apple Records...
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apple_Corps_v_Apple_Computer
Cuando salió el Macintosh, apareció un problemijirillo... tenía sonido, lo que era una violación a los acuerdos que habían logrado, y que le permitió a la empresa yanqui existir... dice que por eso, Apple puso un sonido de alerta, que como recordarán los antiguos usuarios, se llamaba SOSUMI... léase "so sue me". [img]http://www.hifichile.cl/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif[/img] [img]http://www.hifichile.cl/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif[/img]

Se bella ciu satore
Je notre so cafore
Je notre si cavore
Je la tu, la ti, la tua
Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

[quote name='funkyto' date='10 February 2016 - 12:08 PM' timestamp='1455120481' post='338986']
otra mas de ian...
[/quote]

Y a que viene el comentario?
Porque dice "chucha"?, lo puedo cambiar a "diablos" y sonará igual.

"No satisface el saber mucho, sino el sentir y gustar internamente de las cosas" San Ignacio de Loyola

 

¿Y tu hermana?

 

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

[quote name='ian curtis' date='10 February 2016 - 02:29 PM' timestamp='1455128968' post='339005']
Y a que viene el comentario?
Porque dice "chucha"?, lo puedo cambiar a "diablos" y sonará igual.
[/quote]

Ponle "reflauta" mejor :P







... y te van a weiar igual nomas :lol:

Vndo tclado barato, qu l falta una tcla 😏

Nakamichi Amplifier1, Cassettedeck2, ST-3s Tuner, Unison Research Unico CD, Technics SH-GE90 DSP, Technics SL-D33 Turntable, EMOTIVA Stealth DC-1 DAC, JBL model 4312 Control Monitor

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Apple jamas se interesara en las tornamesas, ellos están enfocados en replantear todo lo que hoy es potencialmente "smart" y una tornamos no hay por donde hacerla smart :lol: Por lo mismo Apple esta desarrollando un auto eléctrico y autónomo, al cual le digas "llévame a Marin 014", el auto maneja solo y te vas haciendo la previa en el camino, eso es un claro ejemplo de lo que busca Apple :lol:

"Creemos ser país y la verdad es que somos apenas paisaje" Nicanor Parra

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Invitado
Responder en este tema...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Crear Nuevo...