Saltar al contenido
Pegar imágenes en el foro, mediante equipos móviles ×

Historia de los Nautilus de Bowers & Wilkins


Grendel

Recommended Posts

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Muy bueno, esta marca siempre ha sido objeto de oscuro deseo. Me permito un copy paste del articulo mencionado. Saludos.

Flagship, Icon, Legend.

Posted on 10 March 2021

Share this on

twitterfacebooklinkedin
Blog-beauty-small-1.jpg

Everything about Nautilus seems unlikely. For starters, there’s the way it looks – and it’s hard to imagine a more dramatic or unconventional form in any loudspeaker, never mind one that’s been around for almost three decades. Then there’s the price, of course; £57,750 is a very healthy sum of money to be spending on your dream car, never mind your dream loudspeakers. But perhaps the most unlikely aspect of all is the story of how Nautilus first came to be. This is no ordinary product, not in any sense of the word.

 

Let’s go back to the beginning. Right from the outset, John Bowers recognised that the shape and structure of a loudspeaker cabinet exerted a huge influence on the overall sound of his loudspeaker designs. One of his earliest products, the astonishingly avant-garde DM70C, perfectly encapsulated the agility of his thinking: he wasn’t going to let his quest for True Sound be compromised by something so humdrum as a mere ‘box’. Essentially, he wanted to create a loudspeaker that didn’t sound like a loudspeaker at all – rather, it would deliver a performance so realistic, the listener would believe they were experiencing the live event itself, or the best-possible recording of that event.

 

That led to a lot of innovative thinking. During the 1970s, most of it centred on using new forms and structures for cabinets: the Tweeter-On-Top configuration came first, followed by the three-enclosure construction of the mighty 801. Then there was Matrix bracing, another attempt to quieten the cabinet to the point where it became inaudible. But alongside these development projects – all of which yielded both successful products and core Bowers & Wilkins technologies that we still use to this day – John also pursued another, altogether more experimental line of research that wasn’t linked to any particular timeline or project requirement. 

 

According to the Head of Research at SRE (the Steyning Research Establishment) at the time, Dr Peter Fryer, the inspiration for what would become Nautilus “came right from the top. John Bowers was totally obsessed with perfecting loudspeakers. He wanted his company to start digging thoroughly into all aspects of speaker design and come up with something very special. It didn’t have to make money or sell in great numbers. It just had to be done – a bit like climbing Everest.”

 

At one point, for example, John’s energies were concentrated on developing dipole or backless loudspeakers, where rearward-travelling sound waves could radiate freely away from the drive units. This, in theory, meant you lost the acoustic impact of the cabinet ‘contribution’, because in a typical loudspeaker, high and midrange frequencies tend to travel in a beam, front and back, meaning that rearward-travelling sound waves sometimes rebound off internal cabinet surfaces. 

 

In the end, the backless dipole proved to be a blind alley: no matter how inventively shaped the prototype, listeners could always identify the character of the individual cone materials used in the drive units. And then, very sadly, John passed away in late 1987 after a brief battle with cancer, so it fell to the engineering team at SRE to carry on the quest – and in particular, to Laurence Dickie.

 

A different approach

 

Laurence_Dickie_with_JBAccording to Dr Fryer, John deliberately gave the task of carrying on his project to just one engineer, “with a very simple brief of looking into everything and doing whatever was necessary, however unconventional, to make the best speaker anyone had ever heard.” Laurence Dickie – Dic, to all his colleagues – was that engineer. 

 

Dic decided on a new approach. Instead of an open-backed dipole, he returned to the idea of a loudspeaker enclosure, but set about re-evaluating how the enclosure itself worked. Doing away with a conventional box and instead, mounting the speaker drive units in long, straight ‘transmission-line’ cylinders proved promising: using pipes filled with absorbent fibrous wool, the structure of the cabinet would seek to absorb sound, essentially making each enclosure a reversed version of a conventional horn. 

 

In another big step forward for the time, Dic chose to combine that structural approach with new thinking on drive units. Bowers & Wilkins was using flexible cones in the midrange of all its loudspeakers at that time, with its iconic yellow aramid fibre diaphragm becoming world-renowned in the 801 and many other designs in the portfolio. But Dic wanted to go another way, using stiff, pistonic cones across every aspect of the frequency range. It was an exotic approach for sure – one that remains undeniably difficult to scale to smaller and more affordable loudspeakers. Stiff domes tend to have a fairly limited bandwidth, so to reproduce every aspect of the frequency range correctly, the prototype designs had to adopt a four-way, rather than three-configuration – with two midrange cones, rather than one (one dedicated to lower midrange frequencies, the other to the upper portion). But remember that brief: John had decreed that the aim was simply to deliver the best speaker anyone had ever heard, not something fixed to a given cabinet form, price-point or timescale.

 

So, armed with that freedom to act, Dic took the aluminium tweeter concept used in the 801 and scaled it to a series of increasingly larger aluminium midrange cones with the aim of ensuring that the ‘audibility’ issue that had so plagued those earlier dipole and backless speakers (where listeners could identify the character of each cone) would simply not be an issue in this instance. With every cone made from the same material, the theory was you could no longer hear any transition in character as the speaker operated.

 

An ugly duckling takes flight

 

Nautilus model3At this point, the fledgling that would eventually grow into Nautilus was a decidedly odd-looking bird. In all the early prototype work, three midrange and high-frequency ‘tubes’ were mated to a conventional closed-box bass enclosure, similar in concept to the approach used in 801. However, listening tests were less than satisfactory, showing a very notable discontinuity in character between the bass of the speaker and the sound of the other three drive units in the system – precisely what Dic was trying to avoid. It swiftly became clear that to match the sonic purity of the other three aluminium drivers in their respective transmission-line housings, the bass driver would also need its own pipe. And that was a problem, because using that same straight-tube approach for a 30cm (12in) bass driver would require a straight tube some three metres in length. Striking, yes, but not exactly domestically friendly.

 

So it was back to the drawing board. Experiments showed that tapering the horn shape and then curling it up would perform just as well but would occupy a much smaller volume than a straightforward, constant cross-section pipe. With that breakthrough in mind, the Nautilus as we know it really began to take shape. The tapering tube approach was incorporated into the other three tubes: as the volume of each tube reduced, it compressed the damping wool inside each tube more firmly and further reduced pipe resonances into the process. With all four drivers acting as perfect pistons within their allotted frequency bands, the prototype design was able to create a truly seamless, three-dimensional sound stage, accurately reproducing all the fundamental frequencies. 

 

The Nautilus is born

 

nautilus prototype Midnight-blue Nautilus

 

This new form and new approach to drive unit design would still need the final flourishes of aesthetic refinement: you can see from some of the 1991 and 1992 prototype images that while the overall shape had evolved to its recognisable modern form, there was still some work to do to hone it into the final Nautilus form. That task fell to Alison Risby, from Brighton College of Art, who carefully sculpted the almost-there form, adding nuance and curve to Dic’s acoustically correct structures. And finally, after almost five years of work, the Nautilus was born.

 

But where did the name itself come from? Dic can take credit for that one, although he’s at pains to point out that his creation’s shape has just as much in common with the humble snail as it does with the more exotic marine mollusc. Indeed, he recently joked that at one stage, the team was seriously considering christening their new loudspeaker ‘Brian’, in homage to the snail of the same name in the then-popular TV show, The Magic Roundabout. We’re glad they had a change of heart – although even today it’s common in Bowers & Wilkins circles to refer to a pair of Nautilus, with affection and not a little irreverence, as ‘Snails’.

 

Nautilus colorsDic left Bowers & Wilkins in 1997, but his creation lives on in the Bowers & Wilkins portfolio. And as you would expect, making Nautilus requires just as much skill as engineering it in the first place. These days, cabinets are made in Dale Road, Worthing, and take the form of three sections – a front, plus left and right half-sections. These have to be joined together and painstakingly sanded to manage away any visible ‘edges’ – and that’s just the start of the labour of love that goes into the build process. Paint is sprayed by hand – typically, with 12 coats of paint and lacquer, although that varies depending on the finish the client selects. As standard, Nautilus comes in silver, black or midnight blue, but optionally you can have any colour you want, subject to feasibility. We’ve seen customers match their Nautilus to classic Ferrari Rosso Corsa red and Porsche Viper Green, to modern Audi Daytona Grey and even – remarkably – to nail varnish pink. And perhaps the most laborious process of all is the final step, the meticulous machine polishing of those sensual curves to create the stunning, lustrous finish that is so fundamental to the design’s allure. It takes three days to polish a Nautilus to the required standard. That’s three days per speaker

 

Install and set-up takes skill

 

Nautilus takes know-how to install correctly, too. Technically, it’s a semi-active design, with an external crossover network positioned between the preamplifier and power amplifiers. Each crossover is carefully matched to each drive unit at the factory at the time of construction: if you are unfortunate enough to damage a drive unit in the future and require a replacement, the crossover may need to be adjusted to correlate correctly to that new driver.

 

That configuration means each drive unit requires its own power amplification, so to drive Nautilus you’ll need eight monobloc power amplifiers per pair – or four stereo amps at a pinch. And amplifiers of 100w upwards are recommended, with 500w being optimum for the low frequency drive unit. So essentially, you need to budget on spending pretty much the same again (or more) on source components and amps as you do on the speakers themselves. 

 

And finally, there’s the inherent character of the speakers themselves. Nautilus has extraordinarily wide imaging and exceptional dispersion: it throws out a lot of energy. Depending on the acoustics of your listening room, you may find that causes problems – it’s not uncommon to find absorption on the ceiling in rooms that are dedicated to use with Nautilus.

 

And yet…and yet, despite all the time and effort it takes to make, despite its complexity, cost and the added expense required to get it up and running, Nautilus remains, as we said at the start, an icon of our brand. We’ve been making it for almost 30 years and even today, it’s still a special thing to behold. Unlike 808, it wasn’t designed to hit a sound pressure level target; unlike 801, it was never intended to be both wonderfully accurate and robust enough to cope with the demands of studio life. Nautilus is far too fragile – and being honest, fussy – to stand up to that sort of rigour. It’s the ultimate exotic, rare, demanding but fabulously rewarding for those that can afford it and accommodate its foibles. It was designed to the best speaker anyone had ever heard, full stop. And remarkably, some of its devotees would argue that after all these years, it still is.

 

components

 

Cartel

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

hace 1 hora, UPset64 dijo:

Claro que es barato poh... date una vuelta por las cajitas Wilson😉

Mejor unas Anubis, quien se acuerda de esa estafa.

https://audiovintage.foroactivo.com/t3916-que-es-anubis-audio

 

Cartel

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

 

 

Impresionante! Este video muestra la sofisticadísima fabricación y la enorme inversión en prensas o maquinaria CNC requerida, pero tanto o más sofisticada debe ser la ingeniería que hay detrás. La forma curva del gabinete, por ejemplo, debe estar pensada para obtener la mayor rigidez posible por gramo de material usado y evitar así toda vibración del mismo. Por eso, a mi modesto juicio, no me cabe en la cabeza el que se piense que un gabinete vibrante (a la Harbeth o cualquier BBC), armado casi artesanalmente, pueda obtener una mejor fidelidad.

Porque, por supuesto, todo lo que muestra el video no es nada que un dedicado DYI yendo al homecenter, comprando unos cuantos mdf, pegándolos con agorex y unos pocos tornillos, y comprando unos cuantos drives SEAS o Vifa ... no pueda mejorar.

Editado por pbanados

1: Audioquest Niagara 3000 >CD Sony XA50ES / Rega Planar 3, AT-OC9XML, Moon 110LP / Macmini (Tidal+Roon) > Theoretica BACCH4Mac >RME Babyface pro/ Mytek Brooklyn DAC > Rogue Audio Cronus Magnum III (KT120) >Magnepan 1.7i  

2: TV qled 55"/ Roon> Advance Acoustics MyConnect 50 > Kef LS50 Meta.  

"I've looked at life from both sides nowFrom win and lose and still somehowIt's life's illusions I recallI really don't know life at all" Joni Mitchell

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

 

Impresionante! Este video muestra la sofisticadísima fabricación y la enorme inversión en prensas o maquinaria CNC requerida, pero tanto o más sofisticada debe ser la ingeniería que hay detrás. La forma curva del gabinete, por ejemplo, debe estar pensada para obtener la mayor rigidez posible por gramo de material usado y evitar así toda vibración del mismo. Por eso, a mi modesto juicio, no me cabe en la cabeza el que se piense que un gabinete vibrante (a la Harbeth o cualquier BBC), armado casi artesanalmente, pueda obtener una mejor fidelidad.

Aunque, por supuesto, todo lo que muestra el video no es nada que un dedicado DYI no pueda superar hacer yendo al homecenter, comprando unos cuantos mdf, pegándolos con agorex y unos pocos tornillos, y comprando unos cuantos drives SEAS o Vifa ... no pueda mejorar.

No se si te estás burlando de los DIY de parlantes (me disculpas si no era así), pero yo como representante del gremio te podría  decir que es penoso que haya gente que gaste 100 veces mas en un parlante que suena 20% o 30% mejor. y además el DIY da una satisfacción que solo gastar palta no te va a dar.

Respecto de la comparación con BBC (yo tengo uno), y esto vale para casi cualquier producto, la relación precio calidad es importante y comparar US$ 100.000 con US$ 2.500 es bien injusto. yo me quedo con mis Stirling y  $ 95.000 para viajar y comprar musica.

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

 

No se si te estás burlando de los DIY de parlantes (me disculpas si no era así), pero yo como representante del gremio te podría  decir que es penoso que haya gente que gaste 100 veces mas en un parlante que suena 20% o 30% mejor. y además el DIY da una satisfacción que solo gastar palta no te va a dar.

Respecto de la comparación con BBC (yo tengo uno), y esto vale para casi cualquier producto, la relación precio calidad es importante y comparar US$ 100.000 con US$ 2.500 es bien injusto. yo me quedo con mis Stirling y  $ 95.000 para viajar y comprar musica.

Si el audio se midiera en el porcentaje de mejora... el 90% de lo que nos gusta alabar no estaría justificado. Qué porcentaje mejor suena un amplificador Pass que un otro que cuesta un décimo de su valor? Un DAC dCS que un Dragonfly? Una tornamesa TransRotor que una Rega?

Los parlantes DIY deben ser en efecto un hobby super entretenido y enormemente gratificante, pero lo que a mi me impresiona es ver a personas que sostengan que esos parlantes, por encomiable que sea la dedicación con que se hicieron, puedan competirle a parlantes con órdenes de magnitud más ingeniería y tecnología del fabricación. Para no hablar de la investigación y herencia de décadas que estos fabricantes tienen. Varias veces en el foro he visto parlantes DIY a precios mayores que sofisticados parlantes de alta ingeniería, además con la creencia (sincera, no tengo dudas) que sonarían mejor que ellos...

Sobre los BBC, aclaro: encuentro que muchos de ellos suenan realmente muy, muy bien (Stirling uno de ellos, son deliciosos, no tengo problemas en reconocerlo). Pero primero: no son para nada baratos (en ningún caso más baratos que otros de alta ingeniería equivalentes, y desproporcionadamente caros en relación a su costo de fabricación comparativo), y segundo: tb tienen problemas, con ese defecto de origen de los gabinetes vibrantes "aportando" al sonido del parlante. Razón por la cual las veces que he pensado (seriamente) comprar uno, he terminado comprando otros. Por mucho que eso del gabinete enriquezca el sonido, lo hace a la vez menos "fidedigno" y agregan, aunque sea marginalmente, otros problemas (creo que un BBC difícilmente "desaparecerá" auditivamente si el propio gabinete hace esfuerzos por no hacerlo, por ejemplo).

Editado por pbanados

1: Audioquest Niagara 3000 >CD Sony XA50ES / Rega Planar 3, AT-OC9XML, Moon 110LP / Macmini (Tidal+Roon) > Theoretica BACCH4Mac >RME Babyface pro/ Mytek Brooklyn DAC > Rogue Audio Cronus Magnum III (KT120) >Magnepan 1.7i  

2: TV qled 55"/ Roon> Advance Acoustics MyConnect 50 > Kef LS50 Meta.  

"I've looked at life from both sides nowFrom win and lose and still somehowIt's life's illusions I recallI really don't know life at all" Joni Mitchell

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

 

Si el audio se midiera en el porcentaje de mejora... el 90% de lo que nos gusta alabar no estaría justificado. Cuánto mejor suena un amplificador Pass que un otro que muestra un décimo de su valor? Un DAC dCS que un Dragonfly? Una tornamesa TransRotor que una Rega?

Los parlantes DIY deben ser en efecto un hobby super entretenido y enormemente gratificante, pero lo que a mi me impresiona es ver a personas que sostengan que esos parlantes, por encomiable que sea la dedicación con que se hicieron, puedan competirle a parlantes con órdenes de magnitud más ingeniería y tecnología del fabricación. Para no hablar de la investigación y herencia de décadas que estos fabricantes tienen. Varias veces en el foro he visto parlantes DIY a precios mayores que sofisticados parlantes de alta ingeniería, además con la creencia (sincera, no tengo dudas) que sonarían mejor que ellos...

Sobre los BBC, aclaro: encuentro que muchos de ellos suenan realmente muy, muy bien (Stirling uno de ellos, son deliciosos, no tengo problemas en reconocerlo). Pero primero: no son para nada baratos (en ningún caso más baratos que otros de alta ingeniería equivalentes, y desproporcionadamente caros en relación a su costo de fabricación comparativo), y segundo: tb tienen problemas, con ese defecto de origen de los gabinetes vibrantes "aportando" al sonido del parlante. Razón por la cual las veces que he pensado (seriamente) comprar uno, he terminado comprando otros. Por mucho que eso del gabinete enriquezca el sonido, lo hace a la vez menos "fidedigno" y agregan, aunque sea marginalmente, otros problemas (creo que un BBC difícilmente "desaparecerá" auditivamente si el propio gabinete hace esfuerzos por no hacerlo, por ejemplo).

100% en desacuerdo con todo lo que planteas pero no voy a polemizar más

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

 

Qué porcentaje mejor suena un amplificador Pass que un otro que cuesta un décimo de su valor?

Uuffff...cero!!!!!!!! Mis disculpas a los que les gusta Pass, he tenido un par y escuchado muchos, los amplificadores no me gusta ninguno, creo que la única vez que uno de ellos fue en la dirección de conseguir un sonido razonable fue usando un pre Cary 98...

 

Los parlantes DIY deben ser en efecto un hobby super entretenido y enormemente gratificante, pero lo que a mi me impresiona es ver a personas que sostengan que esos parlantes, por encomiable que sea la dedicación con que se hicieron, puedan competirle a parlantes con órdenes de magnitud más ingeniería y tecnología del fabricación.

Por qué un DIYer podría no tener los conocimientos suficientes de ingeniería para fabricar un buen parlante? Es un juicio definitivamente errado. Los edificios de "antaño", diseñados por ingenieros de gran nivel con menos tecnología que hoy son tanto o más robustos, han sobrevivido siglos...claro, carecen de las comodidades que ofrece la tecnología hoy. A lo que voy con esta analogía es que la ingeniería está en las personas (normalmente en los ingenieros profesionales, pero no es exclusivo de personas con esta formación), no en las máquinas, estas últimas sólo sirven de soporte al ingenio de la persona que diseña, la mayor parte de las funciones que tienen máquinas muy "sofisticadas" puede replicarse con "artilugios" más sencillos, igual o mejor en términos de resultado. Lo importante en un gabinete acústico es el cálculo, las máquinas sólo están para reflejar lo mejor posible ese resultado, y existen muchas, muchas técnicas para ello. 

 

Para no hablar de la investigación y herencia de décadas que estos fabricantes tienen.

Absolutamente, el "know how" es poderoso a la hora de diseñar, sin embargo, pasado el tiempo, ese conocimiento se libera para que la humanidad haga uso. Además, he visto a modestos "DIYers" dedicar décadas de investigación para un diseño, otras veces sólo unas "pocas" miles de horas-persona. @pbanados insisto, definitivamente hay que ser muy cuidadoso con los juicios, muchos, pero muchísimos de los desarrollos que hoy se venden por cientos de miles de dólares (por la inversión que se hace para llegar al producto) partieron de una idea sencilla con el desarrollo inicial disponiendo de pocos recursos. 

 

Varias veces en el foro he visto parlantes DIY a precios mayores que sofisticados parlantes de alta ingeniería, además con la creencia (sincera, no tengo dudas) que sonarían mejor que ellos...

Algunos sí, otros no, y otros depende del gusto...además, el resultado en el audio jamás es por causa del aporte de solamente un componente, algo que he aprendido e insistido mucho es que el match o sinergia entre los diferentes componentes (para los creyentes incluiré hasta los cables :happy4:) es lo más relevante del resultado final. Imagina, hasta yo estoy escuchando KEF con Pass (pre phono) en mi cadena :happy4:

 

 

 

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

 

Por qué un DIYer podría no tener los conocimientos suficientes de ingeniería para fabricar un buen parlante?

Podría teóricamente -aunque muy difícilmente- tenerlo: tendría que saber no solo de ingeniería acústica (de altísimo nivel), sino el uso e interpretación de software de elementos finitos (FEA), boundary element analysis (BEA), entender de análisis de fluidos, etc, etc. Empresas como KEF, B&W, y otras de ese calibre se aseguran de contratar a la creme de la creme de la ingeniería acústica mundial. La mayor parte de los personajes míticos de la historia del audio, miembros de honor de la AES, etc, han salido de empresas como estas. Concentran a los Maradonas, Pelés y Messis del audio. Tienen además acceso a recursos infinitamente más potentes de lo que cualquier DIY pueda tener, y menos en países periféricos como el nuestro: cámaras anecoicas enormes, instrumentación sofisticadísima, software extremadamente caro, capacidad computacional para aprovecharlos, acceso directo a la investigación universitaria de punta, etc. Es conocida la historia del KEF, quienes fueron los primeros en invertir enormes sumas a fines de los años ... 60!... en super computadores de la época para poder correr análisis FEA, por ejemplo, cosa que hasta el día de hoy sigue siendo privativa de solo los mayores fabricantes. Y sin lo cual es virtualmente imposible que puedas competir en esas ligas.

Además está el tema de fabricación: es cosa de ver el video de la planta de B&W era darse cuenta que ningún DIY puede siquiera acercase a eso. Puse el ejemplo del gabinete curvo, algo fácil de comprender pues es evidente y casi universalmente aceptado que el gabinete ideal debiera se completamente inerte: ya es difícil controlar como sonará un driver diseñado ex-profeso para responder de una determinada forma, para pensar que podré controlar con similar exactitud como vibra una lámina de mdf, no ante la señal emitida por el amplificador, sino mucho más indirectamente: a las presiones emitidas dentro de ese gabinete! . Lograrlo (hacer un gabinete inerte) a costos compatibles con la producción en masa y hacerlo sin agregar problemas anexos requiere una sofisticación en la fabricación que está absolutamente fuera del alcance de cualquier DIY, por ejemplo. Al respecto está, por supuesto, el caso citado del famoso gabinete vibrante de la BBC. Este se diseñó ea fines de los años 60 para un fin específico: suplir las falencias de un pequeño gabinete y un minúsculo woofer, que se usaría arriba de una van para monitorear las transmisiones radiales en vivo. Para hacerlo se ocuparon rudimentarios métodos de cálculo de la época ("lump sum analysis") que son aproximaciones numéricas burdas que un computador actual haría en una milésima de segundo. La distancia que hay entre eso y el análisis FEA es más que sideral: es comparar la matemática de un escolar bueno para los números con la de un post-doctor en altas matemáticas. 

Ahora extrapola eso mismo a cosas mucho más complejas aún: diseño de drivers, investigación y producción de materiales y compuestos, técnicas de coating o dopado, geometrías avanzadas de gabinetes, etc. 

 

el "know how" es poderoso a la hora de diseñar, sin embargo, pasado el tiempo, ese conocimiento se libera para que la humanidad haga uso

Quien haga uso de conocimiento que es de dominio público y no propietario (entiendo que las patentes caducan a los 50 años) está varias décadas atrasado en la investigación de punta. Los materiales sofisticadísimos en sus conos de B&W, las aleaciones de KEF (empresa que lleva 50 años introduciendo uno tras otro nuevos materiales o técnicas en fabricación de parlantes), o las técnicas de dopado cerámico del aluminio de Dali o Magico, o incluso el propio material de los conos de Harbeth (EL factor, a mi juicio, que hace a ese parlante ser competitivo a pesar que siguen pegados en técnicas de fabricación de hace medio siglo), son todos propietarios, y lo que los hace competitivos en esta industria.

No estoy diciendo todo esto para polemizar por polemizar (aunque avivar la cueca no estaría mal, no solo se anima el foro, sino cada vez que lo hemos hecho creo que hemos avanzado en como vemos estos temas), sino porque personalmente me inquietan esos juicios absolutistas basados en puras creencias medio religiosas, pero sin fundamentos técnicos. 

Editado por pbanados
  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

1: Audioquest Niagara 3000 >CD Sony XA50ES / Rega Planar 3, AT-OC9XML, Moon 110LP / Macmini (Tidal+Roon) > Theoretica BACCH4Mac >RME Babyface pro/ Mytek Brooklyn DAC > Rogue Audio Cronus Magnum III (KT120) >Magnepan 1.7i  

2: TV qled 55"/ Roon> Advance Acoustics MyConnect 50 > Kef LS50 Meta.  

"I've looked at life from both sides nowFrom win and lose and still somehowIt's life's illusions I recallI really don't know life at all" Joni Mitchell

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

 

Los aviones nacieron en un tallercito de bicicletas. 

 

wright brothers GIF by The Franklin Institute

Y el macintosh también (en realidad, el Apple 1, pero vale la idea). Pero estaremos de acuerdo en que un Mac 128K de 1984 no le compite un segundo a uno equipado con el chip M1 Max de 2021, no cierto? O que el avión de los hermanos Wright no podría ganarle una carrera al Lockhead Stealth...

Editado por pbanados

1: Audioquest Niagara 3000 >CD Sony XA50ES / Rega Planar 3, AT-OC9XML, Moon 110LP / Macmini (Tidal+Roon) > Theoretica BACCH4Mac >RME Babyface pro/ Mytek Brooklyn DAC > Rogue Audio Cronus Magnum III (KT120) >Magnepan 1.7i  

2: TV qled 55"/ Roon> Advance Acoustics MyConnect 50 > Kef LS50 Meta.  

"I've looked at life from both sides nowFrom win and lose and still somehowIt's life's illusions I recallI really don't know life at all" Joni Mitchell

Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Puede que un DIYer pueda hacer un amplificador o parlantes que suenen bien, pero pensar que va a poder fabricar un producto de igual o mejor calidad/performance que productos fabricados por empresas con muchos más recursos (tecnológicos, conocimiento propietario, humanos, financieros, etc.) es errado. Estas empresas tienen años de investigación y experiencia en hacer las cosas. Apple también partió en un garage, pero para crecer e innovar dejaron el garage tan pronto como pudieron.

La ingeniería la conforman la teoría, la teoría aplicada, los materiales y técnicas desarrolladas, las tecnologías desarrolladas, las máquinas construidas, el know how acumulado, etc. - todo producto del trabajo de ingenieros. Los ingenieros van y vienen, pero todo lo que han desarrollado queda.

Seguro que hay DIYers muy talentosos y competentes, pero muy difícil (por no decir imposible) que lleguen a la sofisticación que por ejemplo se muestra en este video entre 6:08 y 10:54.

 

  • Like 1
Enlace al comentario
Compartir en otros sitios

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Invitado
Responder en este tema...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Crear Nuevo...